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Boycotts, blackouts and buying Black this holiday season

#blackoutday2020 boycott Nov 24, 2020
 

From Covid-19 to social justice protests, 2020 has been an unprecedented year. As the holiday season approaches, companies have prepared sales, deals and discounts for in-person and online shoppers. According to the National Retail Federation, 42 percent of holiday shoppers have started their holiday shopping earlier than they usually do. 

But Covid-19 has left many companies in a bad place financially. On top of the already “retail apocalypse” that has been happening within the last decade, over 150 major companies have filed for bankruptcy since the start of the virus. Those companies include J. Crew, Neiman Marcus, Gold’s Gym, JCPenny, Hertz, California’s Pizza Kitchen and Ruby Tuesday.

According to a report by NerdWallet, 40 percent of holiday shoppers say they plan to spend less this year due to the pandemic, and 65 percent say the pandemic will impact the way they plan to give gifts this year....

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Blackout Day draws national attention to Black spending power

Many Black Americans on Tuesday participated in a one-day spending stoppage called Blackout Day. Not opening their wallet was part of a larger effort aimed at highlighting how the Black dollar powers the U.S. economy and how America would be a very different place if Black consumers aren't participating. 

Black athletes and celebrities – including singer Rihanna, Cleveland Cavaliers center Tristan Thompson and rapper Cardi B – have used social media to bring wider attention to Blackout Day in recent weeks. Rapper T.I. said via Instagram that there should be "one day of solidarity in America when not one Black person in America spends a dollar."

The Blackout Day movement is in its infancy and it hasn't caught on with every Black American. Although some African-Americans didn't spend money on July 7, others instead patronized Black-owned businesses — and some likely ignored the call altogether. Either way, the day has its roots in trying to...

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'This is the only way to get real change': How Black Americans are using their purchasing power as a means of protest on #BlackOutDay2020

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Blackout Day 2020 sweeps the Triangle, consumers urged to support only Black-owned businesses

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What Is Blackout Day 2020? Everything to Know About the July 7 Boycott Urging People to Not Spend Money

BY MALLIKA MITRA

JULY 6, 2020
 

Anti-racist protests in the wake of recent high-profile police killings of Black people will take on another form on Tuesday, July 7: economic protest.

Black people spend $1.2 trillion annually in the U.S., according to a 2018 report by Nielsen. But for one day called Blackout Day 2020, organizers of an economic boycott are asking the Black community to spend no money at all, or to spend only at Black-owned businesses.

Boycotts were a key tool in creating change during the Civil Rights Era. For example, after Rosa Parks refused to give her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, to a white passenger, a boycott of the city’s public transportation system eventually led to a federal court ruling that laws keeping buses segregated were unconstitutional.

More recently, there have been boycotts against a Whole Foods that sent home employees for wearing a face mask that said “Black Lives Matter.” Last...

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12 Black Businesses To Support For Blackout Day 2020

Janice Gassam Asare
 
Racial equity has dominated the global conversation for much of June 2020. In early June, more than 14 million Instagram users posted a black square for #BlackoutTuesday as a show of solidarity for the Black Lives Matter movement. While there has some skepticism and confusion surrounding the purpose behind the black squares, many are urging the public towards greater action. On social media there has been some conversation around July 7th, 2020, which has been designated as Blackout Day 2020, a day of economic solidarity with the Black community. A Twitter thread from a user named MarsinCharge detailed how Blackout Day 2020 came to fruition. The origins can be traced back to Calvin Martyr who, following the killing of George Floyd, encouraged his audience to buy and support Black businesses exclusively. While the claim has been made that some celebrities have co-opted...
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Blackout Day 2020 movement encourages supporters to use 'economic power' to fight racial injustice

 4:44 PM CDT July 3, 2020
 

HOUSTON — Texas resident Calvin Martyr wants to bring the black community together in economic solidarity through a nationwide movement called Blackout 2020.

The death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody has struck a chord in the hearts of Americans concerned about the mistreatment of black residents in the United States.

The Facebook group #BlackoutDay2020 was created May 8, but since Floyd’s death on May 25, the private group has rapidly grown to more than 720,000 members as people search for peaceable ways to spark change.

And it continues to gain tens of thousands of new members each day.

The movement focuses on July 7, 2020, a day when supporters have committed to only spending money at black-owned businesses; this includes banks, grocery stores, gas stations, hair salons and all forms of commerce.

"We're going to not...

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